31 August 2011

The Pathfinder Character

Inspired by the recent, forgettable, Conan film, I'd like to play a fighter type in this Pathfinder game.  I want to punch and hack things.  I also don't want to worry about spell-managment, nor am I really feeling very roguish.

Barbarian?  Ranger?  Or straight-up fighter?  The party will likely need a wilderness-type, so if no one else is feeling it, I can play a ranger.  I think my preference, however, lies with a straight-up fighter.

Except there's no such thing!  This is the blessing and curse of systems like Pathfinder.  So many choices, so many ways to customize, which can often create option-paralysis.  In an old school game, you could just make a fighter.  If he wanted to bash things with a shield, cool.  If she wanted to use a net and trident, cool.  Minimal mechanical difference between the two, if any.  But now I'll have to think about feats and the interplay of mechanics, flavor, and concept.  There's a bit of stress there.

4 comments:

  1. Yeah, I see games like 3e and Pathfinder as sort of the worst of both worlds. They're more straightjacketed than say GURPS or HERO System, but with fiddly and complicated than older D&D.

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  2. @Trey -- Well, now you've got me really bummed out about our system choice ;)

    This middle space is also some rationale for lots of supplements. Somewhere out there, in one book or another, is the "perfect" feat or skill that will let me do exactly what I'd like my character to do.

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  3. It's a two edged sword. In 0D&D if I want to kick someone off a cliff or dive around on a chandelier I could do it a 1st level just by asking the Dm which stat should I roll under.

    On the other hand, nothing gives you a feeling of satisfaction than having the bullrush feat just when you need it: when the troll whose about to coup de gras you cleric has his back towards you and is facing an 800ft cliff. "See!" you crow to your min-maxing gaming buddies. "now who wasted a feat!"

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  4. @ Brian. You're right. There's something great about having "that thing" which proves to be awesome just at the right moment.

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